BREAKING NEWS: Entire Census Going on Footnote.com

At this hour, Footnote.com is releasing details of its venture with the National Archives to digitize and make a searchable database of the entire set of available U.S. census population schedules from 1780 to 1930.  Footnote.com presently has the complete 1860 census and about 97% of the 1930 census available on its site.  In a press release from its Lindon, Utah, headquarters, Footnote.com says that the entire census collection will be “interactive,”  as its 1930 and 1860 versions are already.   Here’s the entire press release:

Lindon, UT – October 29, 2009 – Today Footnote.com (http://www.footnote.com) announced it will digitize and create a searchable database for all publicly available U.S. Federal Censuses ranging from the first U.S. Census taken in 1790 to the most current public census from 1930.

Through its partnership with The National Archives, Footnote.com will add more than 9.5 million images featuring over a half a billion names to its extensive online record collection.

“The census is the most heavily used body of records from the National Archives,” explains Cynthia Fox, Deputy Director at the National Archives. “In addition to names and ages, they are used to obtain dates for naturalizations and the year of immigration. This information can then be used to locate additional records.”

With over 60 million historical records already online, Footnote.com will use the U.S. Census records to tie content together, creating a pathway to discover additional records that previously have been difficult to find.

“We see the census as a highway leading back to the 18th century,” explains Russ Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. “This Census Highway provides off-ramps leading to additional records on the site such as naturalization records, historical newspapers, military records and more. Going forward, Footnote.com will continue to add valuable and unique collections that will enhance the census collection.”

To date, Footnote.com has already completed census collections from two key decades: 1930 and 1860. As more census decades are added to the site, visitors to Footnote.com can view the status for each decade and sign up for an email notification when more records are added to the site for a particular year.

View the Census Progress Page on Footnote.com.

In addition to making these records more accessible, Footnote.com is advancing the way people use the census by creating an interactive experience. Footnote Members can enrich the census records by adding their own contributions. For any person found in the census, users can:

  • Add comments and insights about that person
  • Upload and attach scanned photos or documents related to that person
  • Generate a Footnote Page for any individual that features stories, a photo gallery, timeline and map
  • Identify relatives found in the census by clicking the I’m Related button

See the 1930 Interactive Census record for Jimmy Stewart.

“The most popular feature of our Interactive Census is the I’m Related button,” states Roger Bell, Senior Vice President of Product Development at Footnote.com. “This provides an easy way for people to show relations and actually use the census records to make connections with others that may be related to the same person.”

Footnote.com works with the National Archives and other organizations to add at least a million new documents and photos a month to the site. Since launching the site in January 2007, Footnote.com has digitized and added over 60 million original source records to the site, including records pertaining to the Holocaust, American Wars, Historical Newspapers and more.

“We will continue to move aggressively to add records to the site, specifically those that are requested by our members and others that are not otherwise available on the Internet,” said Wilding.

Visit http://www.footnote.com/census/ to see how the census on Footnote.com can truly be an interactive experience.

Footnote.com is a subscription website that features searchable original documents, providing users with an unaltered view of the events, places and people that shaped the American nation and the world. At Footnote.com, all are invited to come share, discuss, and collaborate on their discoveries with friends, family, and colleagues. For more information, visit http://www.footnote.com.

Footnote.com Contact:
Justin Schroepfer
Marketing Director
(801) 494-6517
Justin@footnote.com

GeneaBlogie Commentary: Footnote.com is managing to become a sort of hybrid research/social network site, in the process, no doubt will see its usage grow among several sectors of the relevant market. The site has some of the most desirable features of a resource for scholars as well as a way to have people connect.  This became apparent to me sometime ago and when it came time to make some decisions about where to spend time and money, I chose Footnote.com over World Vital Records.  And no, they haven’t given me any $$ to say that.

Craig

2 Responses to “BREAKING NEWS: Entire Census Going on Footnote.com”

  • George Geder says:

    Hi Craig,

    This is exciting news!
    What are your thoughts on Footnote vs Ancestry.com?

  • How soon will the census records for Indian T. be put on Footnote? says:

    How soon will census records for Indian T. be put on line? I am anxious to see them. It is very how to find them. I understand that the l890 census were burned, but the l890 census for Okla. were saved. If I could see the l890 census of Okla. it would help. I have footnotes and I have found l80 pages of our Indian line. Ida


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