African-Americans


Port Chicago: Tragedy and Travesty

[We were about to board the California Zephyr in Sacramento for the beginning of our Grand Genealogy Journey. But first, for the occasion of the third edition of the Carnival of African-American Genealogy, let’s backtrack in time and distance. The theme of the Carnival is “They served with honor~In Memoriam~African-Americans in the Military, 1914-1953.”  Here, we follow the route of …Continue reading →

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Genealogical Customer Service Kudos

I had to order a copy of a Missouri birth certificate on short notice recently.  I ordered it through VitalChek.   Now the trick is not  to order birth certificates from the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services in Jefferson City, which is the main repository.  Instead, order them from Kansas City or St Louis, which both have statewide records.  …Continue reading →

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Census Sometimes Little Help Tracking Migrations

I put my census form in the mail a little after the first of the month. I also scanned it, and I’m making some family group sheets to go with photographs.  All these items together will constitute our family’s census 2010 documentation. Seventy-two years from now, family researchers may conclude that I have lived in the same county for an …Continue reading →

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“Restore My Name:” The First Edition of the Carnival of African-American Genealogy

Luckie Daniels, proprietor of Our Georgia Roots, a tenacious researcher and tech expert, has taken on the hosting of the first edition of the Carnival of African-American Genealogy.   The theme for the first edition concerns slave research.   Participants are asked to answer one or more of the following questions: What responsibilities are involved on the part of the researcher when …Continue reading →

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Black Confederates: Inconvenient Truth or Racist-inspired Revisionism?

A Long-Sought Photograph, Discovered, Stirs the Pot The photograph of my second great-grandfather was in a book titled Black Confederates (Pelican Publishing 2001), which its editors and publisher  tout as a compilation of historical accounts, photographs and documents relating to blacks who served with rebel forces in the Civil War.  Lewis LeJay (1835-1921) is described in the book through an …Continue reading →

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Lewis LeJay (1835-1921)

There are some ancestors I have given up any hope of ever seeing in a photograph.  So it was with my second great-grandfather, Lewis LeJay of De Soto Parish, Louisiana.   He  was the husband of Syntrilla Brayboy and they were the parents of Sylvia LeJay. Sylvia married Richard William Gines, and they became my mother’s grandparents. Researching the LeJays has …Continue reading →

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CGS February Meeting A History Maker

The African-American History Month presentation of the California Genealogical Society and Library has just concluded minutes ago.  The meeting itself was a history maker. A morning session consisted of a panel of eminent experts from the African-American Genealogical Society of Northern California.  These top researchers were Electra Price, Juliet Crutchfield and Jackie Stewart. Then, in the afternoon, I was set …Continue reading →

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Love Letters from Prairie du Rocher: Epilogue

1. Joseph Perry Micheau and Edna Julia Lewis were married on 27 November 1913, at St. Francis Xavier Church, in Carbondale, Illinois.  They were married for 62 years before Joe died in 1975.  On their 50th wedding anniversary in 1963, they received a special telegram from Pope John XXIII. 2.  She was, at the end of the day, a practical …Continue reading →

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Valentines Day: Love Letters from Prairie du Rocher

Joseph Perry Micheau (born 23 Feb 1888, Prairie du Rocher, Illinois; died 15 Nov 1975, St Louis, Missouri) was a descendant of the French Negroes of Illinois–originally slaves from Jamaica brought to Upper Louisiana  by French entrepeneur Phillipe Renault in the 1720’s.  The Micheau family represent well the social and cultural lives of the descendants of the French Negroes of …Continue reading →

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Black History Month: Knights of Peter Claver – St Elizabeth’s Branch, St Louis, MO

During November, which is Black Catholic History Month, I wrote about the Knights of Peter Claver.  A few days ago, I came across this badge from St Elizabeth’s Catholic Church in St Louis.  St Elizabeth’s was a parish established especially for black Catholics by Fr. John Markoe and his brother, Fr. William Markoe, both Jesuits, during the term of Archbishop …Continue reading →

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