Gines


Grand Genealogy Journey: My Kansas City Families

The Gines Family My closest relatives in Kansas City would be in the Gines family, descendants 0f Richard and Sylvia Gines of Shreveport, Louisiana, (who, as far as anyone knows, never set foot in Kansas City).  Two of Richard and Sylvia’s  sons, William Edward Gines (1898-1955) and Henry William Gines (1903-1980) left Shreveport in 1920 and headed for Kansas City.  …Continue reading →

Happy Mother’s Day, Haplogroup L3!

Yes, a genetic genealogy remembrance of Mitochrondrial DNA Day! Here are my mothers (my matrilineage), as far as I know them, with their spouse’s name in [ ]: Lillian Gines (living)[H.V. Manson] Annie Florida Corrine Long (b. 1902, Kansas City, MO; died 1986, Kansas City, MO)[Wm. E. Gines Mary Elizabeth Johnson (b. 1870, Clay County, MO; died 1946, Kansas City, …Continue reading →

The Mysteries of Adline Gines & Belle Wheeler

The more you learn, the more you don’t know. One of the men named Henry Gines (and that’s a whole other story) was married to a woman named Adline Gines.   Wanting to know more about her,  I obtained her death certificate some time ago.   [Her name is spelled “Adline” on her death certificate and I’ve seen it spelled that wya …Continue reading →

Freedman’s Bank Records Open New Doors, Reveal Much

The Freedman’s Bank, a distinct entity from the Freedman’s Bureau, was established by Congress on March 3, 1865.   The bank’s official name was the Freedman’s Savings and Trust Company.  The bank’s purpose was to assist African-Americans recently freed from bondage to adjust and thrive economically. It had branches in 16 states and the District of Columbia, where former slaves, black …Continue reading →

George Guynes [Gines] Freedman’s Bank Record

George Gines appeared on the 1870 census of Caddo Parish, Louisiana as “George Guion.”  In April, 1872, however, the Freedman’s Bank lists him as “George Guynes.”  The bank record also lists “Ed” and “Henry”  apparently as separate persons.  The absence of Ed on the census, combined with known family naming patterns, had led me to surmise that they were the …Continue reading →

You’ve Broken Down a Brick Wall–Now What?

Hint: You’re Not Going to Disneyland! Next in a multi-part series As with a physical barrier, breaking through a genealogical “brick wall” may expose an entirely new landscape.  The new landscape must be explored, analyzed, and documented.  In other words, once the barrier is breached, the real work begins.  If one realizes this fact early, the new territory can be …Continue reading →

Breaking Down A Brick Wall–The Problem with Surnames, Part II

Fifth in a multi-part series I  had hypothesized that my Gines people were associated with English-speaking people named Gines who came from the West Midlands area.  They came to Virginia and North Carolina and from there moved on to South Carolina and other states of the Deep South, eventually winding up in Louisiana and Texas.   That hypothesis was based on …Continue reading →

Breaking Down A Brick Wall: The Problem With Surnames

Fourth in a multi-part series In the comments to the last post  our friend Apple [her blog is Apple's Tree; visit it!] writes: It certainly seems like the right family. I’ve seen some interesting name variations but how did they get Guion from Gines? Or visa versa. I’d be very comfortable going with this. That’s the very question presented for …Continue reading →

“So What Makes You So Sure You’ve Knocked Down a Brick Wall?”

Remember the The Wrong Longs? Third in a multi-part series One of my other great-grandfathers on my mother’s side was named James William Long.  As with Richard William Gines, I set out to find the parents of James Long.  That search seemed like a stroll in the park compared to this one!  I quickly found a James Long in Kansas …Continue reading →

The Process of Breaking Down a Brick Wall

Second in a multi-part series Here’s a synopsis of how I achieved my #1 research goal: finding the parents of my great-grandfather, Richard Gines of Shreveport, Louisiana.  Bear in mind that eahcof these steps took months or even years to complete and some ran concurrently. Step 1:  The  Neophyte Phase.  I was new to genealogical research and had fairly easily …Continue reading →

September 2014
S M T W T F S
« Sep    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  

Recent Comments

Archives