Language


Breaking Down A Brick Wall–The Problem with Surnames, Part II

Fifth in a multi-part series I  had hypothesized that my Gines people were associated with English-speaking people named Gines who came from the West Midlands area.  They came to Virginia and North Carolina and from there moved on to South Carolina and other states of the Deep South, eventually winding up in Louisiana and Texas.   That hypothesis was based on …Continue reading →

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Carnival of Genealogy: The Language of Families

My family has several linguistic oddities. When The World’s Smartest Sister was a toddler, she couldn’t pronounce the word “brother.”  It always came out as “bubbas.” Her two older siblings were her “bubbas.”   As  she grew older and more adept at the language, we kept the word “bubbas” as a term of endearment.  Later when we acquired The World’s Greatest …Continue reading →

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Family Linguistics

From the Sacramento Bee this morning (February 8, 2008): If you’re looking for distinctive lingo with a heart, tune into the conversations that take place around the house. That’s where families come up with colorful words and terms as individual as Suzy’s untamable cowlicks and Joe’s double-jointed thumbs.. . .Ask people about the special words or expressions their family uses, …Continue reading →

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