North Carolina


Breaking Down A Brick Wall–The Problem with Surnames, Part II

Fifth in a multi-part series I  had hypothesized that my Gines people were associated with English-speaking people named Gines who came from the West Midlands area.  They came to Virginia and North Carolina and from there moved on to South Carolina and other states of the Deep South, eventually winding up in Louisiana and Texas.   That hypothesis was based on …Continue reading →

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Lumbee Tribal Recognition May Come At Last

My cousin Karen Burney and I have both told the story of the Lumbee Indians from whence we believe our Brayboy ancestors come. See our posts here and here. For many historical and political reasons, the Lumbees have not been federally recognized as a tribe.  However they have been recognized by the state of North Carolina.   According to Allgov.com, Lumbee …Continue reading →

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Can DNA Solve "The Lumbee Problem"?

How does a group of people who have American Indian ancestry but no records of treaties, reservations, Native language, or peculiarly “Indian” customs come to be accepted–socially and legally–as Indians? That question is asked on the jacket of the 2001 printing of The Lumbee Problem–The Making of an American Indian People by anthropologist Karen I. Blu (University of Nebraska Press, …Continue reading →

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