South Carolina


African-Native American Research: A Chat with Author Nita Ighner

A few years ago, I came across a blog entitled “Diggin’ Up Bones.” It was extremely well done, recording the research odyssey of its author, Nita Ighner. Her journey took her to the Carolinas where she learned some very interesting things about her family history. She did archival research as well oral history–all quite impressive. Ighner is a college professor …Continue reading →

A Little Bit Closer to Charlotte Manson

Sometimes it seems as if ancestors choose to reveal themselves a little bit at a time.  The records and evidence may be out there somewhere, but they may not be apparent for years. We have noted in this space several times before that I trace my paternal lineage to a Scots woman  named Charlotte Manson.    But she remains a figure …Continue reading →

Names, Places & Most Wanted Faces

I started this with a note on Facebook and it was suggested that it would make a good meme for bloggers.  The idea is to publicize your surnames and locales to see if anyone elseknows something about them.  For me on Facebook, I got several research-helpful replies. So how much better to take it to a wider audience. List the …Continue reading →

"Open" State Vital Records: The Bad and the Ugly

One of Several Posts about Open Government Laws and Genealogy Previously, we spotlighted several states that are particularly “genealogy-friendly” concerning access to state vital records. Now we wade into the swamp of vital records-access horribles. At the edge of the swamp are states that have unreasonably long (100 years or more for birth records; more than fifty years for death …Continue reading →

To Tell the Genealogical Truth

Some Lessons about Census Records Contestant #1: My name is Julia McDavid. I was born in the nineteenth century and had a daughter named Helen. Can you find me in the 1880 or 1900 census? Contestant #2: My name is Julia McDavid. I was born in the nineteenth century and had a daughter named Helen. Can you find me in …Continue reading →

Can DNA Solve "The Lumbee Problem"?

How does a group of people who have American Indian ancestry but no records of treaties, reservations, Native language, or peculiarly “Indian” customs come to be accepted–socially and legally–as Indians? That question is asked on the jacket of the 2001 printing of The Lumbee Problem–The Making of an American Indian People by anthropologist Karen I. Blu (University of Nebraska Press, …Continue reading →

A Brayboy Challenge

One genealogical feature that I’ve come to enjoy recently is Chris Dunham’s “Genealogical Challenge,” which appears from time to time at The Genealogue. Chris challenges readers to find some interesting or obscure genealogical information about an historical or pop culture figure. These challenges and their solutions serve to refine research skills and open up many sources that one might not …Continue reading →

A "Relatively" New Blog of Interest

Karen Burney, who’s one of my Brayboy cousins, has a new blog up called Louisiana Lineage Legacies. Karen shares the stories of her 15 years of genealogical research. Although it is focused on Louisiana, she has a wealth of information about her research in other states, like South Carolina. The surnames she’s studied include Brayboy, Morris, Jefferson, Chestnut, Hines, and …Continue reading →

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